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Left Tarsometatarsus (Left Fused Element Consisting of Ankle and Middle Foot Bones) of the Red-throated Loon Gavia stellata (MCZ 337607)


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Phylogenic Position
Aves - Neognathae - Gaviiformes - Gaviidae - Gavia - Gavia stellata
Species Description
The Red-Throated Loon is the most widely distributed member of the loon family, breeding in the Arctic and wintering in southern Europe and North America (extending as far south as Mexico). It is the smallest and lightest of the loons, and is the only member of the family able to take off from and land directly on land or water. It is primarily a fish eater, but it also eats mollusks, crustaceans and aquatic insects; the Red-Throated Loon uses it feet to propel itself through the water, but will use its wings for acceleration or turning. As recently as the 1800s, Red-Throated Loon behavior has been used to predict the weather, with its flight patterns and calls believed to determine whether or not it will rain; in the Orkney Islands of Scotland, it is called the Rain Goose for this reason.
Specimen Information
Species Gavia stellata (Red-throated Loon)
Element Left Tarsometatarsus (Left Fused Element Consisting of Ankle and Middle Foot Bones)
Specimen Number MCZ 337607
Sex Male
Location Massachusetts
Geological Age Recent
 
Technical Information
Scanner Roland Picza
Resolution 100 ┬Ám
Number of Data Points 120604
Number of Data Polygons 60305
Date Scanned September 25, 2011
Scan Technician Maggie Johnson
Edited By Maggie Johnson
 
Photographs


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Download Digital Model Size
STL File Not Publicly Available 6.0 MB
Other Gavia stellata (Red-throated Loon) Elements
Specimen Element
MCZ 346913 Sternum (Breast Bone)
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